Tag Archives: SPORTS

What I Will & Won’t Do About Guns – REVISED!

In February of 2018, I wrote a blog about my views regarding guns in America. I just reread the piece and found that nothing has changed except for my feelings about semi-automatic weapons. As I originally stated assault-style weapons are nothing different than the .22 semi-automatic rifle I plinked with as a kid. What has changed is the rate of fire and the killing power of the ammunition being used today.

So, here’s what I’d do. First, I’d outlaw the manufacture, sale, and possession of all civilian-marketed semi-automatic weapons both long guns and pistols that utilized an external clip or magazines. Storage of ammunition would have to be internal and fixed by both law and design. Just like my uncle’s old Winchester pump shotgun would only hold five shells and my Smith & Wesson .357 revolver will only hold six bullets, such would be the requirement or limit for all guns.

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Are You Ready to Rumble? Rumble in the Hills, That is!

I don’t know how many years Rocky Fork Lake has been the scene of powerboat racing but after a couple of years absence, it has returned. It was called Thunder in the Hills but the new name is Rumble in the Hills. I’m not sure if this is the 2nd or 3rd year for this iteration, but it’s back and lots of people seem to enjoy it.

I ventured into the dome of death (heat index) to get some BBQ ribs and shoot a few stills and a video.  Now you can sit in your air-conditioned family room and get a hint of what’s going on in Highland County today. Stay cool, stay safe, and enjoy the video.

Super Bowl 38 In A Cowboy Bar

On Sunday, February 1, 2004, Danny Masters and I rolled into Ruidoso, New Mexico and stopped for a beer in what could only be described as a cowboy bar. I was probably the only one in the place not wearing cowboy boots and Wranglers. Even Danny was sporting a pair of boots, jeans, and a snap button western shirt. Adding to the cowboy image was a genuine king-size Marlboro dangling from his lips. The only clue he wasn’t a true son of the West was the one size fits all ball cap with KY embroidered on the front.
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Super Bowl I = A Stick & 5 Coat Hangers

On January 15, 1967, I was living in Downey, CA and the first Super Bowl was to be played in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The competing teams were the Green Bay Packers and the Kansas City Chiefs. The promoters were concerned about profits since a third of the coliseum seats remained unsold at prior to game time. With this and accepted policy that home games be blacked out in their home market the two broadcast networks, NBC and CBS, opted to keep with protocol and black out the Los Angeles area.

Since the closest broadcast stations were in San Diego a special beam antenna was needed to pull in the distant signals. A local rock station, KRLA, decided to fly in the face of big money and offered plans to construct an analog yagi beam antenna that could be built from a long stick, five metal coat hangers, a hand full of screws, and a sufficient length of TV ribbon cable.

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The Great California Potato Super Bowl

During the mid-1960s I was a student at Cerritos College in Norwalk, California. Cerritos had a football team called the Falcons and apparently, they were pretty good at the time. While I never attended one of their regular season games they did win a spot in a small college bowl game in Bakersfield called The Potato Bowl.

For whatever reason, several friends and I decided to make the drive. The Potato Bowl was played in a stadium that was literally a bowl dug into the earth and surrounded by bleacher seats.

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Cavalcade of Sports

This past Saturday I enjoyed a little deja vu. In the 1960s, on many a Friday night, I would watch Gillette’s Cavalcade of Sports, otherwise known as the Friday Night Fights. It was broadcast in black and white from Madison Square Garden in NYC and the ringmaster was the legendary Jimmy Lennon. You could sit in your living room and enjoy the best of the best that the sport of prizefighting could offer.

Archie Moore v. Rocky Marciano

I watched such legends as Ingemar Johansson, Floyd Patterson, Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, Emile Griffith, Archie Moore, Sonny Liston, George Foreman, Sugar Ray Robinson, and a young Cashis Clay. I was living in Downey, California and in the nearby community of Bellflower, a young Jerry Quarry was coming onto the scene in 1965. He would go on to become the world heavyweight champion and entering the ring with the biggest names of the day. Frank Stanley and I had the pleasure of seeing Quarry, in his early years, fight at the Olympic Auditorium in downtown Los Angeles.

Rubin “Hurricane” Carter

Those days are long gone but maybe, they’re coming back. Last Saturday I scanned onto a Fox sports channel and came across what appeared to be the Saturday Night Fights. I watched two championship 10-round bouts for middleweight and super middleweight. Of course, I didn’t recognize anyone but to my surprise and pleasure, the ringmaster was Jimmy Lennon, Jr. carrying on in his late father’s footsteps. Hopefully, this is regular programming and I can break out a Guinness and enjoy some pugilism on the occasional Saturday evening.

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Is The AR-15 a Man Killer?

For several weeks now I’ve taken a serious look at the AR-15, trying to separate truth from fiction. The only truth I’ve found is that there is great disagreement. While the AR-15 is America’s favorite rifle there seems to be a wide diversity of opinion about its standard ammo, the .223 cartridge. I Googled the title of this post and saw lots of people claiming the .223 is not what our military should be taking into combat.

I read a statement from an Army sharpshooter about how many bullets it took to finally take an enemy soldier out. You’ll find lots of disagreement about the .223 being an effective bullet for deer hunting. You’ll also find some articles by ER and trauma doctors who have seen the damage up close and personal.

One trauma doctor said the damage done by a .223 looks like a bomb went off inside the victim’s body while being hit by a 9mm can seem to be not much more than a knife cut. What the .223 does to the body is caused by its velocity. As it travels through the body the bullet is traveling at such a high rate of speed it sends out a shock wave that compounds its effectiveness.

So while I don’t see any mechanical difference between a hundred year old semi-automatic rifle and the latest version of the AR, I do see a great difference in their respective ammunitions. I’ve said in other posts that while I’m not opposed to the AR I am opposed to any device that increases the number of rounds and the rate of fire. Maybe it’s time to consider the permitted velocity of civilian .223 ammo.

Click HERE for an informative article about the damage done by the .223 cartridge.

Ever see Chris Rock’s take on violence in the schools and gun control?

A Bullet Ain’t Just a Bullet

Based on my assumption that there are less critics of a common and long existing .22 caliber semi-automatic rifle, like the one I gave my grandson, than of a .223 caliber semi-automatic rifle that has been labeled an “assault” rifle, I’ve been doing a lot of research on where the truth lies and so far it remains elusive.

L-R: 9mm round, .22LR cal round, .223 AR-15 round

Yesterday my son dug through his junk box and came up with a couple of different sample rounds, a 9mm  and a .223. I searched and found a .22 hollow point.  As you can see in the photo I took the 9mm projectile is quite larger than the other two but the case of the .223 is much larger. The diameter of the .22 and the .223 are almost identical with the .223 projectile being somewhat longer and more aero-dynamically shaped. The cartridge case of the .22 is miniscule compared to the two other rounds.

So, what’s all this mean? It means my grandson’s .22 semi-automatic shoots a bullet almost identical to the military .223 used in an AR-15. The target is getting hit by about the same amount of metal. The 9mm bullet, being larger, will cut a larger hole in the target. In addition to the bullet size is the amount of gunpowder in the cartridge case, the more powder the faster and further the bullet will travel. And when it arrives at the target less energy will have been spent and the potential for damage increases. If the target is an animal or human the bullet may begin to tumble as it enters the body which could multiply the damages. Distance would also be a factor. On the assumption that the 9mm would be shot from a pistol distance would have a major influence on bullet’s potential. Being fired from a rifle the bullet could travel further before losing it’s ability to be effective.  In this comparison the .223 reigns supreme because of its speed or velocity.

While there is no end to the science behind ballistics and to the debate over which is the best ammo round. The one truth I understand is that every bullet has the potential to kill. Oh, and that includes a BB, “it will take your eye out!”

Lance

ARMSTRONG: “A federal judge refused to throw out the U.S. government’s $100 million lawsuit against Lance Armstrong, meaning that the former cyclist will be going to court. Armstrong is being sued under the False Claims Act over his use of performance-enhancing drugs, which the government claims violated his contract with the Postal Service.”

Moby Dogfish, My First Shark

It was around 1997, off the coast of NC, that I brought my first shark aboard my brother’s center console. We were drift fishing around a manmade reef near Morehead City when some deadweight thing took my frozen shrimp and began pulling. There wasn’t any fight or sport. Just an exercise in lifting a piece of lead to the surface.

Once it surfaced my brother identified it as a dogfish and warned me about the sharp spine in front of it’s dorsal fin. We didn’t keep it but when I got back to Joe’s home I looked it up on the Internet and learned that it was the world’s most common family of sharks and highly prized for its food value. One major market is Northern Europe and the UK where it is sold in fish ‘n chip shops and labeled rock salmon.

American fishermen who harvest dogfish export almost all it to Europe. The fins are sold into Asian markets where it’s made into a cheaper form of shark fin soup.

Since that first dogfish I’ve caught a ton of them. In the colder seasons of NC they may be the only thing you catch and you’ll begin to see them as a nuisance. Most species of shark are great fun to catch. A common one in NC is the Atlantic sharpnose and a 10-20 pounder will let you know you’ve had your string stretched.

I’ve yet to eat shark meat but it’s on my bucket list. I have some trepidations about cleaning one since I’ve read that they urinate through their skin and if you don’t clean them properly the flesh will have the taste and flavor of ammonia. I need an old-timer to be with me and teach me the ropes.

The largest shark, and fish, I’ve caught was a 110 pound spinner shark. I caught it off the pier at Emerald Isle, NC. Took me about an hour to get it to the pier and I had to cut it loose since there was no way I could lift it.

Check out this short video of spinning sharks.

538 on the OSU Buckeyes

FiveThirtyEight doesn’t just do political stats. It’s owned by ESPN and is in the sports prediction business as well as politics. Here’s what they’ve got to say about the future of the Buckeyes.

In what may be the biggest college football rivalry game of the year, No. 2 Ohio State beat No. 3 Michigan in double overtime, 30 to 27. Last week, Ohio State had a 61 percent chance of making the College Football Playoff and Michigan had a 37 percent shot, according to FiveThirtyEight’s college football predictions. Ohio is now a 90 percent chance of making the playoff, and Michigan’s chances are down to 2 percent. I went to William & Mary, not exactly a big time football school, but as I understand it the College Football Playoff is a recent innovation that decides who gets to eventually lose to Alabama on national television.

Hope they do better with OSU than they did with Hillary!

I Want My Olympics

My earliest memories of the Olympics is watching news film of Jessie Owens in the 1936 Berlin Olympics. I wasn’t born yet but sometime in my youth I learned about Owens and saw those films.

From there my memories pretty much jump to 1960 and more news footage of Cassius Clay winning the gold metal at the Rome Olympics.

Over my life the Olympics have become bigger, controversial, more inclusive, and more grandiose. Staging a modern Olympics has put more than one nation at the edge of bankruptcy.

There have always been things about TV’s coverage of the Olympics that have bothered me. If you enjoy a more obscure sport you’ll probably not find much attention given to it. That is such in my case since I’m especially fond of bicycle track racing.

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My NBA

The passing of the Globe Trotter’s Meadowlark Lemon got me thinking about the NBA during the 1960s. I lived in Los Angeles at the time and my roommate had a source for free tickets. So, when the Celtics or Royals came to town we’d get a couple of seats and take in the game. We’d also try to never miss a Celtics or Royals game when aired on TV.

5.-CelticsSomewhere along the line I lost interest in professional basketball. Last week, however, I saw that Cleveland was playing the Warriors and decided to give it a try. I didn’t set a timer but I doubt I lasted ten minutes before reaching for the remote and I don’t have a clue about why. The only time since the 60s that I’ve shown interest in the NBA was during the Jordan years with the Bulls. There was just something magnetic about watching Michael Jordan. It became more difficult once Dennis Rodman came on board.

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Notes on Fishing

fishing lineBeen a couple of years since I dug out a rod and went fishing. But in late May a friend and I dragged my boat to the ocean and fed the fishes a little.

I was so busy getting the boat cleaned and ready I had no time left for packing a tackle box. Luckily my rods were still in my van from the last time I went to the saltwater.

During the week I had to stop at a tackle shop a few times and was floored over what has happened to the price of terminal tackle. Lead sinkers are triple what I remember, hooks double, and a spool of good 8 pound line that commonly sold for around $6 was not $15.

Making matters worse, I had everything I bought, and much more, back home in my garage. Where in my garage is another question but before the next trip I’m digging it out.